México 2010 / English version

  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Video Gallery

Loading...

Home BIOGRAPHIES Independence INDEPENDENCE / SERVANDO TERESA DE MIER

INDEPENDENCE / SERVANDO TERESA DE MIER

Share Link: Bookmark Facebook Twitter Google Del.icio.us Myspace

 Previous / Next

SERVANDO TERESA DE MIER (1765-1827)

 

B
orn in Monterrey, Nuevo León, he becomes a monk of the order of Santo Domingo. He studies at the College of Porta Coeli in Mexico City and receives a doctorate in theology. On December 12th, 1794, he gives his famous speech about the Virgin of Guadalupe and, as a result, is exiled to Spain. This starts a series of escapes and reincarcerations from various jails and convents in Spain, France, Italy, and Portugal over the coming years.

 

SERVANDO TERESA DE MIER (1765-1827)

 

                     When he hears about Miguel Hidalgo’s uprising, he goes to London in October 1811 to promote the independence of Mexico through the press. He meets the editor José María Blanco White, as well as Lucas Alamán, and Xavier Mina, whom he joins on his expedition in 1817. He is arrested in Soto la Marina, now the state of Tamaulipas, taken to Mexico, and tried by the Inquisition.

 

                     In 1820, when the Inquisition is abolished, he is sent to Spain but he escapes to Havana and then to the United States. Once the independence is achieved, he returns to Mexico, but is imprisoned in San Juan de Ulúa. The first Constitutional Congress releases him from jail. He criticizes Agustín de Iturbide’s—already the emperor—vanity, declares himself a republican, and is imprisoned in Santo Domingo because of his activities against the Empire. On January 1, 1823, he escapes for the seventh and the last time.

 

                     When Iturbide is overthrown, Mier becomes a representative for Nuevo León in the Constitutional Congress. In 1824 he signs the Constitutive Acts of the Mexican Federation and the Mexican Constitution.

 

                     He dies in Mexico City and is buried with honors in the Convent of Santo Domingo. He is exhumed and found mummified in 1861.

 

                     Many of Mier’s memoirs, speeches and letters have been preserved and are of public interest. Written and published in various places and at different times, they describe the events that surrounded Mexico’s independence and first years of independence. His works are mostly autobiographical and about politics. His most famous work is Historia de la Revolución de Nueva España (History of the Revolution in New Spain), printed in London in 1813.

 
 


SRE

 

Bicentenario en Español

 

Presidencia english version

 

SRE